Author Topic: Sidechaining Compression  (Read 5545 times)

thePhatLady

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Sidechaining Compression
« on: May 09, 2016, 12:18:02 PM »
Hey guys,

I've been messing around with sidechain compression with a dance punk band, and I'm thinking about building a pedal that can duck the guitar/bass based on the kick. Something similar to the Empress Effects is what I'm looking for. I'd appreciate any help, even just suggestions for how to get started designing a board. Thanks!
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midwayfair

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Re: Sidechaining Compression
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2016, 02:26:39 PM »
I can't fathom how you would implement this with a live band.

You need an input source, presumably a microphone, and then you just hook it up to the input of the envelope section of your favorite compressor.

Most guitar compressors are not really set up to handle this. You're better off looking at rack gear.
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diablochris6

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Re: Sidechaining Compression
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2016, 02:56:50 PM »
I agree with Jon. It would be difficult to implement on stage because you would have the mic'd kick drum running to the soundboard and then another wire running from the soundboard to your guitar pedal. That would be quite complicated depending on where the soundboard is at.

I might be wrong, but is side-chain compression that noticeable in a live setting? If the sound guy is doing their job well and the audio equipment is decent, I would think that a good mix would allow that kick drum to have sufficient attack without ducking the rest of the instruments. Live rooms have way too many variables that muddy up any fine-tuned effects.

If you still want to take a shot at this, I'd follow up on what Jon mentioned. Take the Afterlife compressor circuit, for example. Disconnect the R5/R6 junction from pin 1 of the IC and add another input jack there for the envelope source. The tricky part would be making sure to account for impedance and voltage issues of the incoming signal.
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jimilee

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Re: Sidechaining Compression
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 08:40:36 AM »
Dance punk band?


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thePhatLady

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Re: Sidechaining Compression
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2016, 02:03:38 PM »
Thanks for the input! Most of the shows I go to/play in are small basement and house show setups. There's no board, and mixing is limited to amp volume and how loud people play. I'll give your suggestions a go and see how it works out.

Jimi, it's a project a few of my friends have been doing, and I've been doing some engineering/theorycrafting for their live setup. You can listen at http://modelactriz.bandcamp.com/

Thanks again!
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jimilee

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Re: Sidechaining Compression
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2016, 03:45:04 PM »
Very nice, takes me back to my 80s music.


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LaceSensor

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« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 04:57:56 PM by LaceSensor »