Author Topic: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever  (Read 529 times)

Dminner

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Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« on: January 11, 2018, 02:30:13 PM »
I did some work for jptrfx and he sent me one of his fernweh boards. It is a dual delay. I did some fun mods to it in the process of building. One was a baby modulation circuit. It uses only three components! A candle flicker led, a drop down resistor, and a photoresistor. And it works! And I dig it.

I forgot to take a full gut shot before I buttoned it up. So just imagine the most beautiful wiring job ever, but know that It's not that.

« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 02:35:33 PM by Dminner »

jimilee

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Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 04:07:05 PM »
Thatís insanity!


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Pedal building is like the opposite of sex.  All the fun stuff happens before you get in the box.

gordo

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 09:39:38 PM »
Mudder-a-gaad that's a pretty looking enclosure.

somnif

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 09:48:06 PM »
Any worry about the tiny chip in the LED spitting noise into the circuit ? I ran into this with one of the color cycling LEDs a while back.

Dminner

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 10:05:13 PM »
I hear no added noise at all.

somnif

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 10:23:06 PM »
Excellent  ;D . My case may have been due to it being a rather antenna-y fuzz circuit to begin with.

diablochris6

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 11:00:26 PM »
Super clean! Magnificent work, yet again.
Build guides of my original designs and modifications here

culturejam

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2018, 10:19:41 AM »
Any worry about the tiny chip in the LED spitting noise into the circuit ? I ran into this with one of the color cycling LEDs a while back.

Same here. I got one of those crazy rainbow cycling LEDs and it put out a ton of noise in the audio spectrum. Glad to hear the flickering ones aren't noisy.

I hear no added noise at all.

Good! My question is this: can you change the flicker rate by altering the input current? This would technically be changing depth and speed at the same time. I'm just curious if the little IC inside is affected by a change in input current. Probably it's pretty stable down to very low current and then just stops working (which would make sense for its intended application in a battery-powered "candle")

Also, your inbox is fully, homie.  ;D

Dminner

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Re: Dual delay featuring the smallest modulation circuit ever
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2018, 10:43:00 AM »
Any worry about the tiny chip in the LED spitting noise into the circuit ? I ran into this with one of the color cycling LEDs a while back.

Same here. I got one of those crazy rainbow cycling LEDs and it put out a ton of noise in the audio spectrum. Glad to hear the flickering ones aren't noisy.

I hear no added noise at all.

Good! My question is this: can you change the flicker rate by altering the input current? This would technically be changing depth and speed at the same time. I'm just curious if the little IC inside is affected by a change in input current. Probably it's pretty stable down to very low current and then just stops working (which would make sense for its intended application in a battery-powered "candle")

Also, your inbox is fully, homie.  ;D

Whoops. Just deleted some stuff. Also, regarding the depth/speed I didn't try this because I liked how it sounded right away, BUT, according to a spec sheet I saw which showed some curves this should work.