Author Topic: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)  (Read 695 times)

Cybercow

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It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« on: July 18, 2020, 02:47:00 PM »
This is photo-journal of building MadBean’s “Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe circuit PCB, done up in a 1590BB enclosure. (It’s a long read, so you might want to get a cuppa before digging in. WARNING: Circuit Porn.) It can be built in either a standard 9v DC center negative construct, or the builder can opt for the 18v DC supply version. The details are in the build docs for this project.







I always start by first reading the build document a couple of times. (Familiarity is helpful.) Next, I ensure I already possess all the components as defined in the BOM; cross-checking with the ‘shopping list’ and examining the schematic. This takes a little more time, but ensures the build will go smoothly. Then I check the enclosure, PCB, and other hardware to see how easily things will fit once the guts are assembled. By loosely placing the PCB and hardware bits into the box in proximity of where they will most likely sit when finished, I then know I can proceed with the build with what I have.

To ensure the PCB mounted pots will wind up where they are supposed to go, I like to lay the PCB down into the enclosure and use a mechanical pencil to mark the borders. I’ll also extend the lead of the mechanical pencil so I can mark where the center leg of each pot, switch and any LEDs will go. With the inside of the enclosure pencil-marked. I will then measure the distance of the pot legs to the pot center and add that distance to identify where the pot shaft and other holes should be drilled. I drill the pilot holes from inside the enclosure and afterwards, drill them to their respective proper sizes for hardware mounting. At this point, the enclosure is committed to the build.



Populating the PCB is the next step and I prefer to start with the lowest laying components first - the resistors. I place, solder and clip about a dozen resistors at a time. This minimizes the number of protruding leads than can interfere with soldering a PCB that has too many leg extensions sticking out here & there.



Next to populate are the larger, close-to-the-ground components like diodes, sockets and trimmers. Then onto film & ceramic caps and transistors. (In some cases, depending on the build, I socket transistors. But in this build, I’m a confident solderer and know the trannies being used are sturdy.) I populate electrolytic caps and special components last. In this case, the lamp, LDRs and shroud cap retaining legs are last. At this point, it’s a good idea to flip the PCB over and apply a good bit of isopropyl alcohol and rub vigorously with an old toothbrush to clean off any excess flux.





With the PCB fully populated, I will the do a stuffing test by mounting the pots, LEDs and other hardware into the enclosure and squirreling the PCB onto the pot, switch & toggle legs. In so doing, I take careful note of how the PCB sits in the enclosure to see if it is higher on any one side than the other. Such un-even-ness often occurs on builds where there are both pots and toggle switches mounted to the PCB. Sometimes one is higher than the other. To get the PCB to rest level, I will use one of the toggle switch nuts to set the height (length) of the threads that will protrude thru the enclosure. Then I’ll use a straightedge to check the level compared with the pots. Once the toggle switch adjustment nuts are set to the right depth, I hit them with a dab of nail polish to hold them in place for the duration of the build.



Knowing that everything fits properly, sits evenly and I’ve not burned any fingers or toes in the soldering process, I’ll then commit the pots and toggle switches to solder on the PCB while the pots and toggles are fixed to the enclosure. Then, since everything is in place where it will sit when the build is complete, I start preparing the wiring by carefully measuring and place-testing each length of wire before cutting and stripping the ends. I then pre-bend each piece of wire re-test-fit it for loose precision.









Once all the wires have cut, stripped and bent to shape, I remove the guts and either replace them onto a cardboard version of the enclosure top or just wing it and start soldering the wires in small groups. On this build I started with the stompswitch because it has the largest ‘group’ of wires in one location. Then I went on to add the jack wiring. Here was a good spot to conduct a quick test to ensure the stompswitch and LEDs work, so I tack-soldered the DC jack on and fired it up to see if the worked properly. (This is that bit where you may or may not have heard to “rock it before you box it.”) Yay! It works!



Meanwhile, during solder breaks or other interruptions, I would conjure up some artwork with Photoshop and get some waterslide decals printed out, clear-coated and dried.

After everything is wired, (except the DC jack, because it is soldered last after stuffing), the pedal gets another stuff-test and the DC jack gets soldered to the DC supply lines for the initial in-box test. Yay! It still works! But now, I have to remove the guts again so the enclosure can be finished. Heat up the soldering iron again, remove the DC jack, remove the guts and LED bezel and clean the enclosure with an 800 grit sand paper. Washed the enclosure with Dawn dish soap, rinsed thoroughly and let dry. (I used a blow dryer cuz my decals were ready to get laid.)



Final steps: apply the water slide, let dry a day, another half-dozen coats of clear, a dozen light coats of MinWax, re-stuff the guts and solder the DC jack, ensure everything is tight, fire up, test, adjust the offset and gain trimmers to taste, sign the bottom plate of the enclosure and close it up. Voila! It’s a Vibe!



It’s not even a neat or organized workspace. But it gets the job done. Thanks for reading.



Looks like a Pork Barrel (CE-2 circuit) build is on the horizon. Happy building!
Cybercow - aka: Mark Davis

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cooder

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2020, 03:19:03 PM »
Super tidy and thanks for the in-depth detail and photo essay! Smashing build.
The UniVibe is an all time killa of a circuit and sound!
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lars

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2020, 04:32:26 PM »
Very professional build and detailed process. The part that interested me the most is that tiny and perfectly executed LED indicator next to the Intensity control. It's so flush and unobtrusive you almost don't see it (which is the point). Well done.
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NorthCoast

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2020, 05:12:57 PM »
Very nice!

And thank you for posting the build process pics - I always learn something from those when people post them.

"People discuss my art and pretend to understand as if it were necessary to understand..." - Claude Monet

jimilee

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2020, 05:15:30 PM »
Thank you for the photo essay. That’s looks fantastic, and that soldering iron. I spent 12.00 on one just like it. It was supposed to be temporary if I liked the hobby. I used it for 8 years. It still works great, I just replaced it because I wanted a nicer one. I still use it from time to time.


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gordo

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2020, 06:12:12 PM »
Clean build.  Very nice.
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Bio77

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2020, 06:52:23 PM »
Beautiful build!  Top shelf. The solder joints on the resistors are perfect.  Do you flow through the bottom just right, or touch up on the top? 

Cybercow

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2020, 09:32:03 AM »
Beautiful build!  Top shelf. The solder joints on the resistors are perfect.  Do you flow through the bottom just right, or touch up on the top?

Thanks! I start soldering from the bottom and touch-up on top after inspection reveals a need.
Cybercow - aka: Mark Davis

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Cybercow

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2020, 09:35:17 AM »
Very professional build and detailed process. The part that interested me the most is that tiny and perfectly executed LED indicator next to the Intensity control. It's so flush and unobtrusive you almost don't see it (which is the point). Well done.

Thanks!  I'll admit that I took a little extra time on the rate LED. I intentionally drilled the hole too small, then slowly with a hand-reamer kept digging at it, bit-by-bit to get it just right so just the dome was peeking thru the top. Then I used fine-mill file to flatten the LED till it sat flush in the tight hole.
Cybercow - aka: Mark Davis

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Cybercow

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2020, 09:38:49 AM »
Thank you for the photo essay. That’s looks fantastic, and that soldering iron. I spent 12.00 on one just like it. It was supposed to be temporary if I liked the hobby. I used it for 8 years. It still works great, I just replaced it because I wanted a nicer one. I still use it from time to time.

Thanks JimiLee. I've had that cheap little soldering iron for 4 years now and had to replace the wand a couple month ago. It's quite inexpensive, as you've noted, and has a number of tips to change out. The replacement wand was only 4 zorkmids.
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nedonnelly

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2020, 08:24:20 PM »
So I came to this post looking for a reference on which direction (up or down) the toggle parameters (modern/vintage) would go. Luckily your post has already answered that question (left or right & same as the wiring diagram), so you have already helped me tremendously.

BUT, your post also left me with some questions.

1) The LDR's are oriented at a 90 degree angle from the board. Is this how they are supposed to go? I initially just assumed they were tacked down straight to the board and would catch ambient light within the light shield.

2) This is more out of curiosity, but is there a reason you left C33 open? You may have just been waiting for a part to make it through the mail, but maybe you have discovered some mod that I should know about. :D

Thanks for the helpful posts already, and any other help will be icing on the cake!!

Cybercow

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2020, 10:18:06 PM »
Thanks for the helpful posts already, and any other help will be icing on the cake!!

Thanks for the kind words. You're welcome.

1) The LDR's are oriented at a 90 degree angle from the board. Is this how they are supposed to go? I initially just assumed they were tacked down straight to the board and would catch ambient light within the light shield.

The positioning of the LDRs was just a choice. They work fine either way. The light shroud is important.

2) This is more out of curiosity, but is there a reason you left C33 open? You may have just been waiting for a part to make it through the mail, but maybe you have discovered some mod that I should know about. :D

I noted in the build docs that no value for C33 was given in the BOM. In fact C33 was not even listed in the BOM - but it is shown in the schematic. Also, the build document shows a photo of a 9v build that excluded C33 as well. Also, I know the LT1054 charge pump is pretty stable and the datasheet for it demonstrated no need for that 100nF cap in that position. The final result of my build sounds great with no chargepump buzz and the 15v supply is clean. So I just followed the build document. I also don't believe it would be harmful to use it.
Cybercow - aka: Mark Davis

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nedonnelly

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Re: It's a Vibe (“Harbinger 1.5” Uni-Vibe Circuit Build)
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2020, 10:19:26 AM »
Got it! Thank you thank you thank you  ;D