Author Topic: Looking for my next project  (Read 392 times)

Natibah

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Looking for my next project
« on: August 04, 2020, 02:11:51 PM »
I have just recently tried my hand at building pedals. My first pedal was the ross compressor kit from general guitar gadgets: http://www.generalguitargadgets.com/effects-projects/compression/ross-compressor/

I have also built an AB switch after that and put new pots, pickups, switch in a guitar before.

What I am looking to know is if anyone could advise on the madbean scale noob -> zeus the compressor would be rated. I didn't have any difficulty putting the kit together and I am looking to challenge myself to the next level.

Thanks

benny_profane

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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2020, 02:17:46 PM »
The store scale usually accounts for part count/availability, tolerances, precision of build, and calibration—generally, it’s a measure of complexity. That build linked looks to be a ‘cowboy’. Perhaps find something interesting there and give it a try. You can always go to the forum for help if you get stuck on anything.

Natibah

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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2020, 02:23:41 PM »
Thanks!

alanp

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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2020, 05:35:27 PM »
IME, delays, filters, modulation effects, digital... these are what generate Mutable's Level Zero troubleshooting.

Overdrives and fuzzes are good for developing your troubleshooting chops, along with some research into what these transittor and oh-pamps do :) :D :)
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gordo

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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2020, 06:15:44 PM »
oh-pamps.  I like that...
Gordy Power
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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2020, 06:33:33 PM »
Sounds like you have some decent chops if you've come this far.  I think the hardest parts of putting a project together is:
  • sourcing parts
  • troubleshooting if something doesn't work, or doesn't work properly

A number of things make this site a lot easier (and I have no skin in the game, I've just been here so long it's second nature):
  • really good support from the forum (lots of smart people to help you)
  • really good documentation, including a description of the circuit, it's history, potential pitfalls, and enough information that you can follow how/why the board does what it does
  • links to help with part sourcing
  • drill guides are spot on

That said, what do you like?  I can vividly remember my first visit here (around the time the wheel was invented I believe) and being blown away with the scope of projects available.  I'd steer clear of analog delays and modulation for a first Bean project, only because these are rather expensive in parts.  Complexity is mind over matter but when you're shelling out a lot of coin for expensive chips you want to know that you have a solid track record.
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Natibah

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Re: Looking for my next project
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2020, 07:45:58 PM »
IME, delays, filters, modulation effects, digital... these are what generate Mutable's Level Zero troubleshooting.

Overdrives and fuzzes are good for developing your troubleshooting chops, along with some research into what these transittor and oh-pamps do :) :D :)
Not sure what "Mutable's Level Zero troubleshooting" is, but I have been doing some reading on "these transittor and oh-pamps". Hopefully, I will start to understand how the circuits shape the sound.

Sounds like you have some decent chops if you've come this far.  I think the hardest parts of putting a project together is:
  • sourcing parts
  • troubleshooting if something doesn't work, or doesn't work properly

I am looking into buying an assortment of pieces to have on hand for future projects.
I didn't have any troubleshooting on the pedal, a little on the pickups and switch. IN a way I am looking to troubleshoot to understand deeper, but if I never have to troubleshoot, isn't that like winning the lottery.?

A number of things make this site a lot easier (and I have no skin in the game, I've just been here so long it's second nature):
  • really good support from the forum (lots of smart people to help you)
  • really good documentation, including a description of the circuit, it's history, potential pitfalls, and enough information that you can follow how/why the board does what it does
  • links to help with part sourcing
  • drill guides are spot on
Sounds great, especially "enough information that you can follow how/why the board does what it does".

That said, what do you like?  I can vividly remember my first visit here (around the time the wheel was invented I believe) and being blown away with the scope of projects available.  I'd steer clear of analog delays and modulation for a first Bean project, only because these are rather expensive in parts.  Complexity is mind over matter but when you're shelling out a lot of coin for expensive chips you want to know that you have a solid track record.
There a quite a few projects here, so I am trying to narrow down the next one to tackle. Also something to fill out my pedalboard some more, though duplicates that aren't duplicates isn't a horrible thing. I am considering a chorus, phase, or a wah.

Thanks all for advice and guidance.